Ohgod – The Great Silence

In December last year Ohgod released their brand new album The Great Silence. The album is a journey through a glorious progressive rock instrumental landscape. We caught up with Danny Harris (Drums) to find out more. He cracked us up with some of these answers – funny guy!

First off, congrats on the release of your new album The Great Silence.

Where was The Great Silence recorded and who produced the album?

Thanks for taking the time to talk to us about the release. The Great Silence was recorded at Twelve Eleven Studios (guitar, bass and production) and Sound And Motion (drums) here in Cape Town. Our Main man David Houston took the lead in the production of the album, and spent many sleepless nights twiddling over the small things to get it sounding great. Dylan Ellis did the mix and master for the album.

What was it like working with them?

Well David is our homie and since he is part of the band there was no real barriers on a personal level. We all function quite well under pressure and with a lot of work. Dylan Ellis was super nice to work with, he was super calm and professional and made it easy to translate what we wanted in the sound into the mix.

Dylan Ellis was super nice to work with, he was super calm and professional and made it easy to translate what we wanted in the sound into the mix.

Are there any unique challenges in being a purely instrumental band?

For sure, the biggest is getting people to sing along to your songs. 😉 We do get a lot of people air guitaring though. The greatest challenge is to write songs that will be captivating throughout. Since we do not get to follow the standard recipe to the song structure like intro, verse, chorus, etc. We really need to put on our thinking caps to get the songs to flow nicely and create a space for people to lose themselves in.

Tell us about the band dynamics in the recording studio. What is the process and is it all smooth going and fun or are there stressful work times?

There are definitely stressful times. At the time of recording, we were done writing for the most part, but working on new songs are always subject to change in studio, because you really don’t want to put something out that you will regret later on. All of us had the opportunity to work with David one on one, which really opened up the playing field for some creative changes and allowing more time to try out different things.

For sure, the biggest (challenge) is getting people to sing along to your songs 😉

What valuable lessons have you learnt from recording your first album to now?

During the process we noticed problems in our workflow that made it apparent that we needed to change the way we go about things. The writing process has changed dramatically since the production of The Great Silence and we believe that this will have a positive impact on future releases

On the topic of ‘great silence’. You’re working / doing chores, do you prefer silence or background music?

Personally I like silence a lot, mostly because my work environment requires me to listen to music and content the whole day.

Mark you have a truly magnificent mane. What conditioner do you use?

I have not actually asked Mark about this, but I have seen him doing sacrifices in our backyard during a full moon surrounded by small goats dressed like hipsters. I don’t know if that is to do with his hair or his beard, but I swear I saw him cutting a deal with the dark Lord.

What has been the most exciting and rewarding part of releasing your music?

The best part is the reaction we got from our peers and close friends. Everyone knew we were working on it, so having people really enjoy it and expressing their love for the work we put out is surely the best part of it all. We also got listed on Wherepostrockdwells, a postrock youtube channel and have over 13000 plays on the album, in turn making a lot of new fans abroad.

I have seen him doing sacrifices in our backyard during a full moon surrounded by small goats dressed like hipsters. I don’t know if that is to do with his hair or his beard, but I swear I saw him cutting a deal with the dark Lord

What keeps you all motivated?

We are aiming to be an international touring band. We did a tour to India at the end of 2016 beginning of 2017 and that really changed everything for us. We realised that this is what we wanted to do and that we will be doing that more often. I would say touring internationally is a huge motivation, and getting on to local festival lineups is also one of the bigger motivators. We do have some announcements that will be coming in the near future on this topic.

You have played quite a few awesome gigs over the last few months. Which one has stood out for you and why?

There are two events that really stood out in 2017, first being Krank’d Up, Turning Tricks really know how to put together a party in that regard. We had the opportunity to share the stage with Intervals and Memphis May Fire, which was a really great experience. The other being Smoking Dragon in the Drakensburg for New Year’s. We had to go on quite a mission to get there, but it was such a nice place to play a show, with the mountain as the backdrop and a bunch of keen people just jamming out hard to our tunes.

It was such a nice place to play a show, with the mountain as the backdrop and a bunch of keen people just jamming out hard to our tunes.

Where can people see you playing in the coming months? Will you be touring the album?

We will be playing the  Cult Models Agency Launch on 17 March at Roar.
In terms of the album. We are ironing out some details to get us to JHB for a few shows up north, and then we will be announcing another international trip to support the release of The Great Silence.

Thanks for the chat and we wish you continued success with the album

 

Interview by The Original CC
Press photographs Jean Pierre Whitfield | Album art Simon Kennedy